Cutting Grass in Bee Yards

As spring moves into summer here in northwest Washington, the grass grows – with authority.  What looked like a tidy-ish bee yard one week can be a jungle two weeks later. So armed with my trusty power scythe, I headed out for the bee yards.  This is one of those things that folks do not mean when they say “I’d like to spend a day with a beekeeper.”

First the before and after shots of one of my down-river bee yards:

Honeybee hives in tall grass

The yard needs a bit of a trim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Honeybee hives in Northwest Washington state

After The Clearing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see, the grass gets quite tall

Tall grasses obscure honeybee hives

It’s a jungle out there for the bees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The bees have challenges at their lower entrances.

Honeybee hive entrance obscured by grass

Before the “gardener” comes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They do all have an upper entrance as well, but even in tall grass, they seem to like the lower one.

It’s a lot of work, but it is made easier by my Husqvarna power scythe.

Power Scythe used to cut grass

The Power Scythe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I love it, but they seem to be made for folks over five foot seven inches.   I wind up hoisting it up into uncomfortable positions to make it work.  But it does the job.

Surprisingly, the bees don’t seem to mind the noise or the blade, even when it is right in front of them.  Which means that I can do this without a bee suit (or as I call it on hot days: the wearable sauna).

Beekeeper in Tee-Shirt while cutting grass at hives

I am so glad the bees don’t mind the scythe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of course I try to clear the grass on warm days when the bees are otherwise occupied pulling in nectar and honey, so that could be the reason for the total disregard of the noise and moving blades.

They seem pretty happy when I’m done -

Honeybees fly from hives

Wide Open Spaces

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are now back into our “normal” June weather: wet and cold.  Which means the grass is getting nicely watered to continue its summer growth.  Oh well, that’s nature.

We’re almost on the solstice – so happy summer to those in the north, and a hoping a gentle winter to those in the south.

 

About Bean

I am the beekeeper at Brookfield Farm Bees And Honey, near Maple Falls, Washington. My bees fly from naturally treated, antibiotic-free hives in the foothills of Mt. Baker (the second most glaciated volcano in Washington). I sell the raw honey my bees make, as well as honey produced by Washington beekeepers who are friends - the emphasis is on raw honey from naturally treated, antibiotic-free hives. I also make and sell Raw Honey Infusions (Ginger, Lavender, and Vanilla Bean; Raw Honey Infused Organic Vinegars; and Beeswas Salves. You can find me or my husband at Seattle's Fremont Market and at Bellingham's Farmers Market. When not with the bees, you'll most likely meet me up some mountain trail, pinhole camera and digital camera slung over my shoulders, and my pack goats trailing behind me.
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