New Queens In New Hives

The queen bees have come – with more still coming.  The first queens have been placed in their hives (the splits I wrote about in the previous blog post), and are laying.  This post covers how I put them in and the result.

I should have taken a photo of one of the queens and her attendants in her box.  I got involved in my work and forgot to do that; so all these photos are from when I pulled the queen out.

My hives are all 10 frame hives.  To install the queen in her hive I pull out one frame and open up the area in the center of the hive.

Queen bee installation box in place

Workers check out empty queen box

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I place the queen’s box with candy up and the net area on the queen box facing towards the front of the hive.

Queen honey bee transportation box after queen release

The queen has been released.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These queens came with candy plugs.  I drop a drop or three of water onto the candy to dissolve it a bit and give the workers a start on freeing their queen.

After 4 to 5 days, I went back to pull the boxes.

Worker bees and empty queen box

Worker Bee Checks Out the Empty Box

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m pleased to say that all the queens were released and all had started to lay eggs.  One queen got a bit excited and layed two eggs in one cell and none in another cell.  No problems, it happens when they’re just out of the box.

Honeybee eggs in frame cells

Eggs – with a few misses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The empty queen transport boxes were pulled out, but before I could push the frames together and replace the frame I had pulled for space, the burr comb had to be replaced.  It is amazing how much comb the girls can build in four to five days.

Nine out of ten of these hives are doing fine.  The second boxes have been put on; honey, eggs, and larvae are in place.  One hive had queen failure.  They let her lay some eggs, then she either died of travel stress or the bees killed her.  I’ve some nice supercedure cells in that hive, so I will wait to see what the queens look like who emerge from them.  I would always prefer 10 out of 10 on queen success, but I’ll take 9 out of 10.

How goes your summer work in the bee yards?  Or how is the “winter’s coming” prep going down south?

About Bean

I am the beekeeper at Brookfield Farm Bees And Honey, near Maple Falls, Washington. My bees fly from naturally treated, antibiotic-free hives in the foothills of Mt. Baker (the second most glaciated volcano in Washington). I sell the raw honey my bees make, as well as honey produced by Washington beekeepers who are friends – the emphasis is on raw honey from naturally treated, antibiotic-free hives. I also make and sell Raw Honey Infusions (Ginger, Lavender, and Vanilla Bean; Raw Honey Infused Organic Vinegars; and Beeswas Salves. You can find me or my husband at Seattle’s Fremont Market and at Bellingham’s Farmers Market. When not with the bees, you’ll most likely meet me up some mountain trail, pinhole camera and digital camera slung over my shoulders, and my pack goats trailing behind me.

This entry was posted in Beekeeping, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *